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20130318
20130326
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KQED (PBS) 32
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pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute between arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizon
. in 2010, federal judge walker struck it down saying it violated the equal protection under the law. in a split decision, a three-judge panel of the circuit court of appeals upheld that ruling last february. setting the stage before the u.s. supreme court. this past valentine's day, gay couples demanded marriage licenses at san francisco city hall as they have every year since 2004. they were turned away. >> it affects us in so many ways in our every day life. what we want is to be treated fairly. >> scott: i spoke with lieutenant governor gavin newsom recently about what compelled him to take a leading role in the gay marriage debate nine years ago. >> thanks for having me. >> scott: take us back to 2004. the marriage licenses began to be issued in san francisco. you had just gotten into office. what got into you? >> i went to the state of the union. nancy pelosi made a terrible mistake by giving me her husband's ticket to watch the state of the union. i was listening to the issues of the day. abstinence and drug testing. he would fulfill his private commitments now made public to
calling for the rule of law, something he says china urgently needs today. >> i refused to bow my head in submission, so they hit me again and again. i lay in a pool of my own blood for more than three hours. we must abolish it as soon as possible. the law should protect people's rights. >> for now, life goes on in china's hated like -- hated gulags. tang hui's incarceration has led even china's official media to say that it is time the system was swept into the dustbin of history. >> a time of change in china. finally, from the jungle of the amazon to the concrete jungle of new york. he lives in -- lived in a brazilian village it is so remote it is a five-day boat ride to the nearest town. now, through a fellowship program, he is learning to speak english and make documentaries in the city that never sleeps. as you can imagine, it is quite a shock. >> from a village deep in the amazon to one of the busiest cities in the world. how would you cope with that kind of transition? that brings today's show to a close. you can watch "bbc world news" on your local channel. i am katty kay. than
on gun control laws; life and death in the emergency room in newark, new jersey and high speed internet changing what we watch and how we watch it. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the federal reserve stood by its aggressive plan to stimulate the u.s. economy, keeping short-term interest rates at record lows. and it said there are signs the economy is getting stronger. one of those signs-- unemployment-- fell to a four- year low of 7.7% in february. still, the fed predicted it won't reach 6.5% until 2015. the fed and its chairman, ben bernanke, also had words of caution for congress. >> i do believe that long-term fiscal stability is extremely important and i urge congress and the administration, as i always do when i go to testify, to do whatever is necessary to put us on a sustainable fiscal path going forward. but in doing so, i think it's a good idea to pay attention to the impacts in the near term on what is still not a completely satisfactory recovery. >> sreenivasan: congress moved a step closer to advancing a spending bill that would
frank is a very large -- it is a complicated law. probably more complicated than i would have preferred, but it is what it is. at the heart of it is ending too big to fail, giving the government new tools to resolve large financial institutions when they feel in a way it will not hurt taxpayers and not subject them to risk. well, it forced losses on the shareholders and creditors of the large financial institutions, which is where they belong. it also requires the federal reserve board to have much tougher prudential standards, so higher capital, more stable liquidity, less reliance on short-term debt. those are the types of things that were problems during the crisis and the fed has been mandated to have better regulation to prevent banks from getting in trouble to begin with. the volcker rule, too, a key part, it was designed to prohibit proprietary trading by those institutions in the government safety net. if you're a bank holding company that has an insured bank that has fdic-backed deposits or access to the federal reserves discount window, you have a lot of government support pro
. that is rule of law. if they were to break that for financing purposes that would be very, very different. cyprus when you compare that to the u.s. housing which is positive and may be offsetting in terms of what washington has taken away by tax increases and sequestration it is a small episode. >> let's dig deeper. do you think that the level of profit growth will not justify any real further expansion of the price earnings multiple or what? >> i would say the first part, yes. if you look at profits they are very, very strong and have been for a while but it is a maturing earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. th
into law as soon as possible. >> woodruff: in fact, bipartisan efforts are underway in both the house and senate to craft immigration overhaul plans. details are still being hammered out, but the president today restated his goal. >> we know that really form means to continue to strengthen our border security and holding employers accountable. we know really form means providing a responsible pathway to earned citizenship for the 11 million undocumented immigrants who are currently living in the shadows. really form requires modernizing the legal immigration system so that our citizens don't have to wait years before their loved ones are able to join them in america. >> woodruff: the senate's so-called gang of eight negotiators had hoped to have agreement last week on a plan that is close to the president's priorities. but a dispute arose over wages and visas for lower-skilled guest workers. if that can be resolved, lawmakers could introduce a plan after congress returns from a two-week recess. to walk us through the political state of play we're joined by reporter sarah murray who ha
and senate to overhaul u.s. immigration laws. today speaker of the house john boehner called the house version a "pretty reasonable solution." the number of americans dying from alzheimer's disease has increased by 68% in the last decade. according to the alzheimer's association, one in three seniors have some form of dementia when they die, and the disease accelerates the progression of other life- threatening conditions. because alzheimer's has no cure or treatment to slow symptoms, a growing elderly population means dementia mortality rates will only continue to rise. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: pope francis formally took office today with a special mass and ceremonies. we begin with a report from james mates of independent television news in rome. >> it was among the ordinary pilgrims to st. peter's that pope francis started his day. it is common now for a pope to kiss babies-- less so for them to get out of the popemobile and walk over to give a blessing to a disabled person. inauguration mass at st. peter's square was less or nate than
passed the law. there's a quarter of a million guns still out there. how does this save any lives? what about the video games that kid was obsessed with? what about the 10-year-olds playing those games every day? >> look at the movies. they use those guns. >> you mean portrayed aggression. >> it's just so sawed. >> okay -- >> why not? why can't we fix those things? >> what we're about here, if you go to the movies and you see it, okay. it doesn't mean you have a gun. the whole purpose is to eliminate the guns that in fact cause these. >> do you think -- >> what about the guns already out there? >> do you think there should be perhaps a redistribution or also something else included besides withdrawing hardware, states. >> absolutely. >> background checks. >> background checks but also focusing on comprehensive measur >>> issue three. going for broke. >> if your dreams of a golden retirement age seem to have become transmuted into tin by the global economic crisis, you are not alone. a new report shows that only only hirds of american workers two-thirds of from three out of four in 2009.
institutional reforms in terms of italy, still rigged labor laws, very hard to start a legitimate business, same thing in spain. so they've done very little of the reforms to revive these economies. instead they just borrow more and more and more. and pile on more taxes. it's a recipe for kwlure seeing unfold in sigh pulse are -- for what you're seeing unfold in sigh pulse are. >> politicians have struggled to -- sigh pulse are. >> poll -- cyprus. >> politicians have struggled with that. the united stateses is to move about half of its 100 international staff out of syria because of concerns for their safety. the decision comes after mortar shells fell near their hotel. the most -- most of the distribution work is now carried out by syrian staff themselves. u.s. secretary of state john kerry made an unannounced visit to afghanistan and vowed to stick by president hamid karzai despite mr. karzai's hostility toward the u.s.-led military efforts in the country. earlier this month the afghan president accused the u.s. of can lewding with the taliban -- colluding with the taliban. italy's highest cou
now from wall street to washington. this week, law makers are working toward a measure that keeps the government up past next wednesday that's when current funding runs out. but the real budget battle over long-term spending cuts continues. >> republicans and democrats in washington are still fighting over taxes and spending but they've agreed to keep the fight under control. house already passed a bill to keep the government running past the end of this month. now the senate is preparing to do the same thing and there, the two parties aren't far apart on the details. >> we've con ens didded the number of amendments being talked about seriously. i commend them and their staff through all of their efforts. >> i spoke with them this morning. they've yet to reach an agreement. >> but the gap remains huge for a long-term plan for bringing government spending and revenue inline. >> they'll reduce the entitlement programs but only if republicans agree to tax hikes and jepd speaker john boehner said the house's answer to that is no. >> the president got his tax heights on january 1st. th
agenda. >> we still have no budget from the president in violation of the law. he gets his ncaa bracket in on time, but no budget. >> the nba bracket -- republicans like to beat him up on that one. ryan budget passes the house. what happens to that budget next? >> it dies in the senate. it only got 40 votes in the senate. it was seen as the ineffectiveness of severe austerity, an economic plan in europe, and i do not think we need to started here. >> good news, the government will not shut down, not at least until the end of september. >> i think we need to give credit to senator barbara mikulski on this. she negotiated a great deal in the senate and also the house. she has come through as a top- notch legislator. that said, bigger problems are ahead of us. >> the 8% of defense will kick in, so there will be furloughs. >> they have delayed the furloughs because of the continuing resolution. >> that is a good point because 28% of all federal hires are we talk about how much we revere and respect and admire veterans. they are the ones that will get laid off. >> the republicans are lucky t
that would stave off another government shutdown for now. it struggled to reach an agreement on new gun laws, rejecting an assault weapons ban and taking tiny steps toward tightening background checks. political leaders in and out of congress rushed to catch up with rapidly shifting public pinion on same-sex marriage. and republicans looked inward to find out what went wrong in 2012. >> people want us to be bold. and i think this it is true. this is an unprecedented thing for a national party to put their cards on the table face up, but this is what we're willing to do to build our party. i think it was necessary. i think people wanted the report to be real. they wanted it to be honest. they wanted it to be, if it had to, raw and maybe a few pieces of china needed to be broken. gwen: words. they called themselves stuffy old men, took real pokes at themselves. but did it go beyond that, karen? >> well, it was an after-action report. the r.n.c. had put together a commission and they had done thousands of interviews. the bottom line, he said the party is in a cull decak, reached a point where t
was signed in law in march 1st full effect is remain to be seen. all eyes on washington. i'm pleased to have alan krueger back at this table. welcome. >> my pleasure. >> rose: what's the essence of this which is sort of like asking moses of the ten commandments which are the important two. give me the essence of what you discover and you want the american public to know. >> you touched on it. the u.s. economy went through a traumatic period. financial crises was extraordinarily deep. we lost $16 trillion in wealth. but we are digging our way out of this problem. we've regained now almost 15 trillion of the lost wealth. over the last 36 months we've added private sector jobs every month, a total of 6.4 million. that's good enough. that's not good enough for this president. he made very clear the state of the union that his north star is creating an economy that provides more middle class jobs. every day he's focused on what we can do to make america a magnet for jobs but we're pointed in a better direction. we make the point in the introduction that even though economics is often called the
international law to the realm of cyber conflict. it seeks to protect civilian targets such as hospitals and schools in a full blown cyber warfare. follows reporting which has linked the chinese military to u.s. government and corporate computer network. chie these government officials have strongly denied the claims. meanwhile the united states have established a new cyber command led by general keith alexander. he testified before the arms services committee last week. this is an offensive team that the defense department would use to defend the nation if it were attacked in cyber space. joining me now from washington to discuss the developing battle ground david sanger of the "new york times." welcome. >> great to be back with you. >> tell me why security experts are saying this has become if not our biggest national security threat the one emerging with the most concern for them. >> well it's certainly our newest and it may be among the urge else as it's an issue of consider debate. it's urgent because there are cyber attacks on the united states, mostly on u.s. corporations that tak
governor, jack dalrymple. he opposes abortion, but has not said whether he would sign the bill into law. a compounding pharmacy in augusta, georgia is recalling all of its injectable medicines after an inspection by the food and drug administration. earlier this week the same pharmacy recalled the drug avastin, when five patients got serious eye infections after using the medicine. f.d.a. inspectors found issues at the pharmacy that call into question the sterility of its drugs. the president of myanmar declared a state of emergency in several townships after fighting between buddhists and muslims left at least 20 people dead. the city of meikhtila was covered in thick, black smoke as firefighters raced to put out fires set by rioting mobs. and police fanned out and seized machetes and hammers along the way. ethnic violence has spread in myanmar over the past two years, when decades of military rule ended and the country turned toward democracy. the parliament of cyprus adopted laws today to create a solidarity fund to pool state assets and impose capital controls on banks. the votes we
the aloites, even though they've lost effective national control are tile continue some sort of law. mr. landis used the example before, and i think it is right on, what we saw in iraq where you had for years various sunni group continue to take the battle against the shi'a forces. >> rose: joshua, would you contradict what richard said? >> the big danger for obama is you're not going to end the civil war by destroying the syrian state. there are over 1,000 militias in the opposition. some of them are al qaeda connected. the islamic front, which leans in that direction, is perhaps the most powerful collection of militias. and then there are other militias that we're trying to cultivate and give our aid to which are more liberal islamist militias. so-- and the danger is all these militias are sharing arms. they're working together. so if you give arms to your militia, you can't guarantee that they're not going to be shared with the more-- other islamic front militias. and that's problem. we haven't been able to just give arms to our militias, for example, and say-- and have them stay the
of the money for the president's health care reform law. how did that come about? >> republicans got a couple small victories in its continuing resolution. obamacare, the affordable care act, what the administration is doing is using money to get the infrastructures for the exchanges up in running so that in 2014 when the affordable care act kicks in those exchanges are hopefully ready to go. republicans have been trying to chip away at, that deny the funding, disthis continuing resolution funds the infrastructure at a lower level that the's a victory for republicans trying too erode away obamacare any way they can. they had a couple others on guns other issues. >> woodruff: so they don't have the votes to repeal it but they are able to undermine it. i want to ask you about one other piece of news. majority leader harry reid announced as part of the gun control legislation that will come up in april he will include bill or language devoted to strengthening background checks. what's so t significance of that have in this big gun control cycle? >> this is news because there's been bipartisan ne
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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